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Current Sexual Health Reports

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 177–182 | Cite as

Female sexual enhancers and Neutraceuticals

  • Michael L. Krychman
  • Jyothirmai Gubili
  • Leanne Pereira
  • Lana Holstein
  • Barrie Cassileth
Article

Abstract

Throughout the ages, humans have searched for new ways of enhancing sexuality and sexual performance. We review some of the more popular products, such as herbs, botanicals, combination products, and topical formulations that have been heralded as sexual enhancers or have mythological roots suggesting they can be used for the treatment of sexual dysfunction. Lastly, we discuss sexual touch (Tantra), aroma, nutrition, and exercise as modalities that have been used to improve or enhance sexual function.

Keywords

Sexual Function Sexual Dysfunction Sexual Desire Female Sexual Function Index Female Sexual Dysfunction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael L. Krychman
    • 1
  • Jyothirmai Gubili
  • Leanne Pereira
  • Lana Holstein
  • Barrie Cassileth
  1. 1.Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship MedicineHoag HospitalNewport BeachUSA

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