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Incentives in Rheumatology: the Potential Contribution of Physician Responses to Financial Incentives, Public Reporting, and Treatment Guidelines to Health Care Sustainability

Abstract

Concerns about the sustainability of current health care expenditure are focusing attention on the cost, quality and value of health care provision. Financial incentives, for example pay-for-performance (P4P), seek to reward quality and value in health care provision. There has long been an expectation that P4P schemes are coming to rheumatology. We review the available evidence about the use of incentives in this setting and provide two emerging examples of P4P schemes which may shape the future of service provision in rheumatology. Currently, there is limited and equivocal evidence in rheumatology about the impact of incentive schemes. However, reporting variation in the quality and provision of rheumatology services has highlighted examples of inefficiencies in the delivery of care. If financial incentives can improve the delivery of timely and appropriate care for rheumatology patients, then they may have an important role to play in the sustainability of health care provision.

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Correspondence to Mark Harrison.

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MH, KM, TM and AHA declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Health Economics and Quality of Life

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Harrison, M., Milbers, K., Mihic, T. et al. Incentives in Rheumatology: the Potential Contribution of Physician Responses to Financial Incentives, Public Reporting, and Treatment Guidelines to Health Care Sustainability. Curr Rheumatol Rep 18, 42 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11926-016-0596-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11926-016-0596-6

Keywords

  • Health care
  • Health care sustainability
  • Health care costs
  • Pay-for-performance (P4P)
  • Incentives
  • Delivery of care