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Current Rheumatology Reports

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 25–30 | Cite as

The utility of nutraceuticals in the treatment of osteoarthritis

  • Tracy M. Frech
  • Daniel O. Clegg
Article

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) treatment is limited by the inability of prescribed medications to alter disease outcome. As a result, patients with OA often take food substances called nutraceuticals in an attempt to affect the structural changes that occur within a degenerating joint. The role of nutraceuticals in OA management can be defined only by an evidence-based approach to support their use. This paper reviews the clinical trials studying glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, vitamin C, vitamin E, and avocado-soybean unsaponifiables. It highlights the need for additional randomized, placebo-controlled trials to further define the utility of nutraceuticals in OA treatment.

Keywords

Osteoarthritis Rheumatol Glucosamine Chondroitin Sulfate Knee Osteoarthritis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of RheumatologyUniversity of Utah School of Medicine, George E. Wahlen Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 4B200 School of MedicineSalt LakeUSA

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