Depression and Anxiety in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Etiology and Treatment

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in reproductive age women and is associated with an increased prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms. This review presents potential mechanisms for this increased risk and outlines treatment options.

Recent Findings

Women with PCOS have increased odds of depressive symptoms (OR 3.78; 95% CI 3.03–4.72) and anxiety symptoms (OR 5.62; 95% CI 3.22–9.80). Obesity, insulin resistance, and elevated androgens may partly contribute to this association. Therefore, in addition to established treatment options, treatment of PCOS-related symptoms with lifestyle modification and/or oral contraceptive pills may be of benefit.

Summary

Screening for anxiety and depression is recommended in women with PCOS at the time of diagnosis. The exact etiology for the increased risk in PCOS is still unclear. Moreover, there is a paucity of published data on the most effective behavioral, pharmacological, or physiological treatment options specifically in women with PCOS.

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Correspondence to Anuja Dokras.

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Laura G. Cooney and Anuja Dokras declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Cooney, L.G., Dokras, A. Depression and Anxiety in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Etiology and Treatment. Curr Psychiatry Rep 19, 83 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-017-0834-2

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Keywords

  • PCOS
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Treatment