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Ophthalmology Issues in Schizophrenia

Abstract

Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder associated with not only cognitive dysfunctions, such as memory and attention deficits, but also changes in basic sensory processing. Although most studies on schizophrenia have focused on disturbances in higher-order brain functions associated with the prefrontal cortex or frontal cortex, recent investigations have also reported abnormalities in low-level sensory processes, such as the visual system. At very early stages of the disease, schizophrenia patients frequently describe in detail symptoms of a disturbance in various aspects of visual perception that may lead to worse clinical symptoms and decrease in quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the various studies that have explored the visual issues in schizophrenia.

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Conflict of Interest

Carolina P. B. Gracitelli, Ricardo Y. Abe, and Alberto Diniz-Filho declare that they have no conflict of interest. Fabiana Benites Vaz-de-Lima is a medical manager for Abbvie. Augusto Paranhos Jr. is a consultant for Allergan, Inc. Felipe A. Medeiros has received financial support from Alcon Laboratories Inc., Bausch & Lomb, Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Heidelberg Engineering, Inc., Merck Inc., Allergan Inc., Sensimed, Topcon, Inc, Reichert, Inc., National Eye Institute. Research grant–Alcon Laboratories Inc., Allergan Inc., Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Reichert Inc. Consultant–Allergan, Inc., Carl–Zeiss Meditec, Inc.; Novartis.

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Correspondence to Carolina P. B. Gracitelli.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders

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Gracitelli, C.P.B., Abe, R.Y., Diniz-Filho, A. et al. Ophthalmology Issues in Schizophrenia. Curr Psychiatry Rep 17, 28 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-015-0569-x

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Keywords

  • Schizophrenia
  • Visual impairment
  • Visual deficits
  • Dopamine
  • Glutamate