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Why Do Migraines Often Decrease As We Age?

Abstract

Migraine undergoes both an evolving state in the formative years but also has a remitting state which bears resemblance to the former. Underlying genetics may contribute to the initiating sequence for these processes but the patient’s lifetime environment may influence the expression of the disease. Systems rarely thought of in terms of neurologic disease such as the inflammatory system may have significant contributions to modulating this process and accounting for the clinical presentation of migraine.

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Conflict of Interest

Dr. Frederick G. Freitag reported receiving consultancy from Transcept and honoraria from Allergan. Dr. Freitag reported receiving payment for the development of educational presentations including service on speakers’ bureaus from Zegenix. Dr. Freitag is employed with the HealthTexas Provider Network.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Correspondence to Frederick G. Freitag.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Migraine

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Freitag, F.G. Why Do Migraines Often Decrease As We Age?. Curr Pain Headache Rep 17, 366 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11916-013-0366-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11916-013-0366-3

Keywords

  • White Matter Hyperintensities
  • Vasodilatory Capacitance
  • Endothelium
  • Microglia
  • Immunocompetent
  • Spreading Depression
  • Neurogenic Inflammation
  • Oxidative Stress
  • Ferritin