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The Role of Positive Traits and Pain Catastrophizing in Pain Perception

  • Psychiatric Management of Pain (M Clark, Section Editor)
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Abstract

A variety of biological, psychological, and social factors interact to influence pain. This article focuses on two distinct, but connected, psychological factors—positive personality traits and pain catastrophizing—and their link with pain perception in healthy and clinical populations. First, we review the protective link between positive personality traits, such as optimism, hope, and self-efficacy, and pain perception. Second, we provide evidence of the well-established relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain perception and other related outcomes. Third, we outline the inverse relationship between positive traits and pain catastrophizing, and offer a model that explains the inverse link between positive traits and pain perception through lower pain catastrophizing. Finally, we discuss clinical practice recommendations based on the aforementioned relationships.

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Kim Pulvers declares she has no conflict of interest.

Anna Hood declares that she has no conflict of interest.

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Pulvers, K., Hood, A. The Role of Positive Traits and Pain Catastrophizing in Pain Perception. Curr Pain Headache Rep 17, 330 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11916-013-0330-2

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