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Interferons as antiangiogenic agents

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Abstract

Interferons (IFNs), pleiotropic cytokines that regulate antiviral, antitumor, apoptotic, and cellular immune responses, were the first endogenous antiangiogenic regulators identified. In a species-specific manner, IFNs inhibit secretion of such angiogenic factors as basic fibroblast growth factor from tumor cells. The antiangiogenic activity of IFNs is enhanced when they are combined with other antiangiogenic agents, such as tamoxifen and thalidomide.

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Lindner, D.J. Interferons as antiangiogenic agents. Curr Oncol Rep 4, 510–514 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11912-002-0065-4

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