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New Information on the Genetics of Stroke

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Abstract

Ischemic stroke, white matter hyperintensities related to small vessel ischemia, and intracranial aneurysms all show heritability. This review focuses on recent progress in understanding the molecular genetics of these disorders. Also reviewed is recent progress in understanding single-gene disorders in which stroke is a major feature of the phenotype, including CADASIL, CARASIL, hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysm and muscle cramps, and Fabry disease and progress in pharmacogenomics as it relates to response to antiplatelet therapy.

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Abbreviations

CHARGE:

Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology

FIA:

Familial Intracranial Aneurysm

GENOA:

Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy

ISUIA:

International Study of Unruptured Aneurysm

TRITON-TIMI 38:

Trial to Assess Improvement in Therapeutic Outcomes by Optimizing Platelet Inhibition with Prasugrel Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 38

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Acknowledgment

Dr. James F. Meschia has received the following grants: SWISS R01 NS39987 and CREST R01 NS38384.

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No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

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Correspondence to James F. Meschia.

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Meschia, J.F. New Information on the Genetics of Stroke. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 11, 35–41 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11910-010-0155-x

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