The Pros, Cons, and Unknowns of Search and Destroy for Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

Abstract

Antibiotic drug discovery has not kept pace with the development of microbial resistance to these agents. There are ever increasing reports where the causative agents of serious infections are multi-drug resistant and in some cases resistant to all known antibiotics. The emergence and spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae has heightened awareness regarding antibiotic stewardship programs and infection prevention and control measures. There has been much controversy regarding the utility of the “search and destroy” strategy to prevent the spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. These controversies center on screening and management of carriers, including decontamination and isolation. It is however clear that a functional infection prevention and control program is fundamental to any strategy that serves to address the spread of microbes within a healthcare facility.

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Andrew Whitelaw reports other from MSD, personal fees from MSD, personal fees from Astra-Zeneca, outside the submitted work. Prashini Moodley has no disclosures to report.

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Moodley, P., Whitelaw, A. The Pros, Cons, and Unknowns of Search and Destroy for Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae . Curr Infect Dis Rep 17, 27 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11908-015-0483-8

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Keywords

  • Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae
  • Antibiotic drug discovery