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  • Mechanisms of Hypertension and Target-Organ Damage (JE Hall and ME Hall, Section Editors)
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Potential Mechanisms Behind the Blood Pressure–Lowering Effect of Dynamic Resistance Training

Abstract

Purpose of Review

To elucidate the hemodynamic, autonomic, vascular, hormonal, and local mechanisms involved in the blood pressure (BP)–lowering effect of dynamic resistance training (DRT) in prehypertensive and hypertensive populations.

Recent Findings

The systematic search identified 16 studies involving 17 experimental groups that assessed the DRT effects on BP mechanisms in prehypertensive and/or hypertensive populations. These studies mainly enrolled women and middle-aged/older individuals. Vascular effects of DRT were consistently reported, with vascular conductance, flow-mediated dilation, and vasodilatory capacity increases found in all studies. On the other hand, evidence regarding the effects of DRT on systemic hemodynamics, autonomic regulation, hormones, and vasoactive substances are still scarce and controversial, not allowing for any conclusion.

Summary

The current literature synthesis shows that DRT may promote vascular adaptations, improving vascular conductance and endothelial function, which may have a role in the BP-lowering effect of this type of training in prehypertensive and hypertensive individuals. More studies are needed to explore the role of other mechanisms in the BP-lowering effect of DRT.

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Funding

This study was supported by the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPQ, process 304436/2018-6), the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP, process 2018/12390-1) and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES, process 0001).

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Correspondence to Cláudia Lúcia de Moraes Forjaz.

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Fecchio, R.Y., Brito, L.C., Peçanha, T. et al. Potential Mechanisms Behind the Blood Pressure–Lowering Effect of Dynamic Resistance Training. Curr Hypertens Rep 23, 35 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11906-021-01154-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11906-021-01154-5

Keywords

  • Strength training
  • Hypertension
  • Hypertensives
  • Vascular
  • Endothelial function
  • Autonomic nervous system