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Bisphenol A, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Epidemiological, Laboratory, and Clinical Trial Evidence

  • Pathogenesis of Hypertension (W Elliott, Section Editor)
  • Published:
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Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure has become one of the most common environmental chemical exposures in humans. There is growing evidence regarding an association between BPA exposure, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). If BPA exposure is indeed associated with raised blood pressure and CVD, it would be a major public health problem. Therefore, we reviewed the epidemiological, laboratory, and clinical trial evidence for an association between BPA exposure, CVD, and hypertension, and discussed the possible mechanisms in this article. Cross-sectional studies in various ethnicities suggested a possible association between BPA exposure and hypertension; this association was supported by a panel study and a randomized clinical trial. Despite the discordance among cross-sectional studies about an association between BPA exposure and CVD, a longitudinal study shows that BPA exposure is a risk factor for CVD. The effects of BPA exposure such as endocrinal disturbance, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation, epigenetic change, and links with other chronic diseases may highlight a possible mechanism between BPA exposure, CVD, and hypertension. To clarify the causal relationship, well-designed studies are needed in the future.

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Correspondence to Yun-Chul Hong.

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Changwoo Han and Yun-Chul Hong declare that they have no conflict of interests.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article contains studies with human subjects performed by the authors. All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Pathogenesis of Hypertension

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Han, C., Hong, YC. Bisphenol A, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Epidemiological, Laboratory, and Clinical Trial Evidence. Curr Hypertens Rep 18, 11 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11906-015-0617-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11906-015-0617-2

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