Role of Oral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Current and Future HIV Prevention Strategies

Abstract

Treatment as prevention is expected to have a major role in reducing HIV incidence, but other prevention interventions will also be required to bring the epidemic under control, particularly among key populations. One or more forms of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) will likely play a critical role. Oral PrEP with emtricitabine-tenofovir (Truvada®) is currently available in the US and some other countries, but uptake has been slow. We review the concerns that have contributed to this slow uptake and discuss current and future research in this critical area of HIV prevention research.

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Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank Keith Rawlings and Gilead Sciences for providing Table 1 data and the members of the DAIDS/NIAID PrEP Working Group for their contributions to the original development of Table 2. Special thanks to Lester Freeman (HJF-DAIDS Contractor) for his excellent assistance in preparing and submitting the manuscript.

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David N. Burns, Cynthia Grossman, Jim Turpin, Vanessa Elharrar, and Fulvia Veronese declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Burns, D.N., Grossman, C., Turpin, J. et al. Role of Oral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Current and Future HIV Prevention Strategies. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep 11, 393–403 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11904-014-0234-8

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Keywords

  • HIV/human immunodeficiency virus
  • Prevention
  • PrEP/pre-exposure prophylaxis
  • ARVs/antiretrovirals