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Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Epidemiology, Etiopathogenesis, and Management

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represent a complex array of disease processes with variable epidemiologic penetrance, genetic antecedents, and phenotypic presentations. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of primary and secondary EIMs as well as salient treatment strategies utilized.

Recent Findings

While the genetic antecedents remain incompletely understood, the treatment armamentarium for EIMs has expanded with new pharmaceutical drug classes that effectively treat IBD.

Summary

EIMs are an increasingly recognized complication of IBD that require prompt recognition, multidisciplinary management, and a multifaceted therapeutic approach. This review highlights the complexities and ramifications of EIM management and offers therapeutic guidance.

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Correspondence to Miguel Regueiro.

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- AG: none. - MR: Miguel Regueiro serves as a consultant and advisory boards for Abbvie, Janssen, UCB, Takeda, Miraca, Pfizer, Celgene, Seres, and Amgen and receives research support from Abbvie, Janssen, Takeda, and Pfizer and unrestricted educational grants from Abbvie, Janssen, UCB, Pfizer, Takeda, Salix, and Shire.

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Garber, A., Regueiro, M. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Epidemiology, Etiopathogenesis, and Management. Curr Gastroenterol Rep 21, 31 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11894-019-0698-1

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Keywords

  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Extraintestinal manifestations
  • EIMs
  • Epidemiologic penetrance
  • Genetic antecedents
  • And phenotypic presentations
  • Large intestine