Nutritional Strategies in the Management of Adult Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Dietary Considerations from Active Disease to Disease Remission

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic, lifelong, and relapsing illnesses, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, which involve the gastrointestinal tract. There is no cure for these diseases, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy can induce remission and maintain clinical remission. Malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies among IBD patients result in poor clinical outcomes such as growth failure, reduced response to pharmacotherapy, increased risk for sepsis, and mortality. The aim of this review is to highlight the consequences of malnutrition in the management of IBD and describe nutritional interventions to facilitate induction of remission as well as maintenance; we will also discuss alternative delivery methods to improve nutritional status preoperatively.

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Correspondence to Douglas L. Nguyen.

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DLN, BL, VM, MSM, LP, and MB declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Nguyen, D.L., Limketkai, B., Medici, V. et al. Nutritional Strategies in the Management of Adult Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Dietary Considerations from Active Disease to Disease Remission. Curr Gastroenterol Rep 18, 55 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11894-016-0527-8

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Keywords

  • enteral nutrition
  • nutritional considerations
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • malnutrition
  • perioperative nutrition support