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Vascular liver diseases

Abstract

This article reviews the primary circulatory liver diseases, which include Budd-Chiari syndrome, obstruction of the hepatic portion of the inferior vena cava, portal vein thrombosis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (veno-occlusive disease), nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and peliosis hepatis. In addition, two systemic cardiovascular diseases that impair hepatic circulation, ischemic hepatitis and congestive hepatopathy, are briefly discussed. A characteristic of the primary circulatory liver diseases is that portal hypertension usually precedes liver dysfunction; however, this is not the case with the primary parenchymal liver diseases, in which liver dysfunction always progresses before portal hypertension is manifested. Significant overlap exists among the diseases and risk factors that predispose patients to the primary circulatory liver diseases, though the pathogenesis of individual diseases varies.

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DeLeve, L.D. Vascular liver diseases. Curr Gastroenterol Rep 5, 63–70 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11894-003-0011-0

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Keywords

  • Inferior Vena Cava
  • Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt
  • Portal Vein Thrombosis
  • Polycythemia Vera
  • Essential Thrombocythemia