Pharmacologic management of gastroesophageal reflux disease

Abstract

The burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from its widespread prevalence and the unfavorable impact of its symptoms on well-being and quality of life. Whereas abnormalities of the antireflux barrier (lower esophageal sphincter) are important in the pathophysiology of GERD, pharmacologic therapy for GERD is based on suppression of acid, which is responsible for the majority of the symptoms and for epithelial damage. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the agents of choice for achieving the goals of medical therapy in GERD, which include symptom relief, improvement in quality of life, and healing and prevention of mucosal injury. As a class, these drugs are extremely safe. The newest PPI, esomeprazole, brings a statistically significant increase in healing of mucosal injury and symptom relief in patients with erosive esophagitis, compared with omeprazole and lansoprazole. This article reviews the role of medical therapy in the short-and long-term management of symptomatic patients with or without erosive esophagitis, including extraesophageal presentations, GERD during pregnancy, and Barrett’s esophagus. Management of refractory patients is addressed.

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Ramakrishnan, A., Katz, P.O. Pharmacologic management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Curr Gastroenterol Rep 4, 218–224 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11894-002-0066-3

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Keywords

  • Omeprazole
  • Esophagitis
  • Lower Esophageal Sphincter
  • Lansoprazole
  • Esomeprazole