The Expanding Role of Natural Killer Cells in Type 1 Diabetes and Immunotherapy

Abstract

Treatments for autoimmune diseases including type 1 diabetes (T1D) are aimed at resetting the immune system, especially its adaptive arm. The innate immune system is often ignored in the design of novel immune-based therapies. There is increasing evidence for multiple natural killer (NK) subpopulations, but their role is poorly understood in autoimmunity and likely is contributing to the controversial role reported for NKs. In this review, we will summarize NK subsets and their roles in tolerance, autoimmune diabetes, and immunotherapy.

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Fig. 1
Fig. 2

Abbreviations

NK:

Natural killer cell

Teff :

T effector cell

Tregs :

T regulatory cells

T1D:

Type 1 diabetes

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Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Correspondence to Allison L. Bayer.

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Chris Fraker and Allison L. Bayer declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes

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Fraker, C., Bayer, A.L. The Expanding Role of Natural Killer Cells in Type 1 Diabetes and Immunotherapy. Curr Diab Rep 16, 109 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11892-016-0806-7

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Keywords

  • Natural killer cells
  • Diabetes
  • Tolerance