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Current Diabetes Reports

, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp 510–516 | Cite as

Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Children and Adolescents

  • Robert Henry SloverII
Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes (D Dabelea, Section Editor)

Abstract

Continuing glucose monitoring (CGM) is a relatively new and rapidly developing technology that shows promise for the future management of type 1 diabetes. When used with near-daily frequency, it has a significant effect on improvement of glucose metabolism as measured by HbA1C and reduction of hypoglycemia. It appears to be safe and actually reduces both DKA and severe hypoglycemia. Early studies indicate that it should be cost effective.

Keywords

Diabetes Continuous glucose monitoring Monitoring Children Adolescents 

Notes

Acknowledgments

R.H. Slover II has received the following grants:

(1) NIH U01 HD041890 / Effect of Metabolic Control at Onset of Diabetes on Progression of Type 1 Diabetes. 05/01/2009–10/31/2014.

(2) Medtronic/An In-clinic, Randomized, Cross-Over Study to Assess the Efficacy of the Low Glucose Suspend (LGS) Feature in the MiniMed Paradigm X54 System with Hypoglycemic Induction from Exercise. 05/01/2010–04/30/2013.

(3) Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF)/22-2011-639 Treat-to-Range Closed-Loop Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes: SMART Rx 09/01/2011–08/31/2013.

Disclosure

R.H. Slover II has received research support from Medtronic, a company that manufactures the device.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Barbara Davis Center and The Children’s Hospital ColoradoUniversity of ColoradoAuroraUSA

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