Current Diabetes Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp 350–356 | Cite as

Virus Infections and Type 1 Diabetes Risk

Article

Abstract

Common intestinal infections caused by human enteroviruses (HEVs) are considered major environmental factors predisposing to type 1 diabetes (T1D). In spite of the active research of the field, the HEV-induced pathogenetic processes are poorly understood. Recently, after the first documented report on HEV infections in the pancreatic islets of deceased T1D patients, several groups became interested in the issue and studied valuable human material, the autopsy pancreases of diabetic and/or autoantibody-positive patients for HEV infections. In this review, the data on HEV infections in human pancreatic islets are discussed with special reference to the methods used. Likewise, mechanisms that could increase viral access to the pancreas are reviewed and discussed.

Keywords

Type 1 diabetes Pancreatic islets β-Cell destruction Environmental factor Virus Enterovirus Coxsackievirus Echovirus Prolonged infection Chronic infection Enterovirus detection Detection of viral RNA In situ hybridization RT-PCR Immunostaining VP1 immunostaining Enterovirus 5-D8/1 antibody Diabetogenic mechanism Diabetogenic enteroviruses 

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Intestinal Viruses Unit, Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and ControlNational Institute for Health and Welfare (THL)HelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Department of Molecular PathologyUniversity Hospital TuebingenTuebingenGermany

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