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  • Genetic Syndromes, Screening, and Surveillance in Colorectal Cancer (N Kubiliun, Section Editor)
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The Role of CT Colonography as a Screening Tool for Colorectal Cancer

Abstract

Most colorectal cancers (CRC) are preventable through screening and polyp removal; however, CRC remains fixed as the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. This is largely due to suboptimal screening participation. This review of current literature explores the use of CT colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy, as another option for CRC screening. Relevant recent research topics include exploring the elimination of pre-procedure colon cleansing, the extension of recommended CTC screening intervals, the implications of extracolonic findings, and the significance of CTC radiation dose in a benefit/risk analysis. Peer-reviewed literature supports CTC as a viable option to safely screen average and moderate risk patients for CRC with polyps and cancer detection rates comparable to optical colonoscopy. CTC has the potential to raise CRC screening rates in population health management efforts.

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Correspondence to Cecelia Brewington.

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Vasantha Vasan declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Cecelia Brewington is a member of the CT Colonography Committee for the American College of Radiology.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Genetic Syndromes, Screening, and Surveillance in Colorectal Cancer

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Vasan, V., Brewington, C. The Role of CT Colonography as a Screening Tool for Colorectal Cancer. Curr Colorectal Cancer Rep 13, 293–301 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11888-017-0378-1

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Keywords

  • CT colonography
  • Virtual colonoscopy
  • Colonoscopy
  • Stool tagging
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Colon cancer screening
  • CT colonoscopy risk/benefit
  • Population health screening