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Screening Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer: What Should We Advocate to Our Patients?

Abstract

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Several medical societies have provided formal guidelines recommending various modalities for average-risk populations. These recommendations universally support the use of high-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy for screening. However, there are differences in the support for fecal DNA stool testing and CT colonography. Regardless of the test, it is imperative that physicians and their patients be aware of the characteristics, benefits, and limitations of each modality. This review discusses the recommendations and provides an up-to-date review of the literature for colorectal cancer screening.

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Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Correspondence to Amy Wang.

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Wang, A., Lieberman, D. Screening Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer: What Should We Advocate to Our Patients?. Curr Colorectal Cancer Rep 6, 8–15 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11888-009-0036-3

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Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Screening tests
  • Fecal ocult blood tests
  • CT colonography
  • Colonoscopy