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Current Understanding of Cannabinoids and Detrusor Overactivity

  • Overactive Bladder (U Lee, Section Editor)
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Abstract

Purpose of Review

The purpose of this review is to review current studies of cannabinoids and the urinary bladder.

Recent Findings

Cannabinoids have been identified in the urinary bladder and are purported to play a modulatory role in detrusor overactivity (DO) as there is a change in the expression of cannabinoid receptors (CBR) in these patients compared to healthy controls. Studies using knock-out mice suggest sensory urodynamic endpoints can be modified by activation of the CBR. Clinical studies demonstrated that Cannabis improves urgency in patients with neurogenic DO.

Summary

CBR are involved in micturition at both peripheral and CNS sites. CBR expressed in afferent fibre endings in the urothelium could influence bladder function. CBR agonists may be useful for future treatment of DO as there is altered CBR expression in these bladders. In addition, FAAH-2 has been localised in human bladder and future studies may show that this enzyme has a role in bladder dysfunction.

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Correspondence to Evangelia Bakali.

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Dr. Bakali and Dr. Tincello declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Bakali, E., Tincello, D. Current Understanding of Cannabinoids and Detrusor Overactivity. Curr Bladder Dysfunct Rep 12, 86–94 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11884-017-0414-7

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