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New Insights into the Vulnerable Plaque from Imaging Studies

Abstract

The concept of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque first developed through histological evaluation of post-mortem coronary arteries has been significantly advanced in recent years by new imaging modalities. Imaging has: 1) verified histological findings, 2) identified features that are associated with unstable plaque, 3) followed plaques over time to study the dynamic nature of vulnerable plaque, 4) predicted clinical events based on imaging features, 5) tested the impact of medical interventions on plaque morphology. This review will summarize the major findings of imaging studies with a focus on how the knowledge base of vulnerable plaque has been advanced.

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References

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Robert S. Fenning and Robert L. Wilensky declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Fenning, R.S., Wilensky, R.L. New Insights into the Vulnerable Plaque from Imaging Studies. Curr Atheroscler Rep 16, 397 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11883-014-0397-1

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Keywords

  • Necrotic core
  • Plaque rupture
  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Thin cap fibroatheroma