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The Potential for Emerging Microbiome-Mediated Therapeutics in Asthma

Abstract

Purpose of Review

In terms of immune regulating functions, analysis of the microbiome has led the development of therapeutic strategies that may be applicable to asthma management. This review summarizes the current literature on the gut and lung microbiota in asthma pathogenesis with a focus on the roles of innate molecules and new microbiome-mediated therapeutics.

Recent Findings

Recent clinical and basic studies to date have identified several possible therapeutics that can target innate immunity and the microbiota in asthma. Some of these drugs have shown beneficial effects in the treatment of certain asthma phenotypes and for protection against asthma during early life.

Summary

Current clinical evidence does not support the use of these therapies for effective treatment of asthma. The integration of the data regarding microbiota with technologic advances, such as next generation sequencing and omics offers promise. Combining comprehensive bioinformatics, new molecules and approaches may shape future asthma treatment.

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Acknowledgments

Dr. Ozturk would like to thank the Turkish Thoracic Society Fellowship Programme for supporting her work at the UIC Department of Medicine Finn-Perkins Laboratory.

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Correspondence to Patricia W. Finn.

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This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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This article is part of the Topical Collection on Asthma

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Ozturk, A.B., Turturice, B.A., Perkins, D.L. et al. The Potential for Emerging Microbiome-Mediated Therapeutics in Asthma. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 17, 62 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11882-017-0730-1

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Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Innate immunity
  • Interleukin-33
  • Microbiota
  • Thymic stromal lymphopoietin
  • Toll-like receptors