Current and Emerging Therapies for IgE-Mediated Food Allergy

Abstract

Food allergies are a growing clinical problem leading to increased health care utilization and decreases in patient quality of life. Current treatment recommendations include strict dietary avoidance of the offending food as well as use of self-injectable epinephrine in case of accidental exposure with allergic reaction. Although many individuals will eventually outgrow their food allergies, a substantial number will not. Significant effort has been made to find novel treatments that protect patients from food-triggered reactions as well as to develop immune-modulating therapies that could lead to tolerance. In this review, three therapies that have shown the most promise for the treatment of food allergies are highlighted: oral immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy, and epicutaneous immunotherapy.

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Correspondence to Robbie D. Pesek.

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Dr. Pesek declares no conflict of interest. Dr. Jones reports grants from NIH-NIAID, FARE-Food Allergy Research Education, Allergy Research Corporation, DBV Technologies, and National Peanut Board; personal fees from FARE-Food Allergy Research Education, Stallergenes, Kansas City Allergy Society, Mercy Children’s Hospital, Riley Children’s Hospital, Southwestern Medical School-Children’s Medical Center, European Academy of Allergy & Clinical Immunology; New York Allergy & Asthma Society; Iowa Society of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, and University of Iowa, Paul M. Seebohm Lectureship in Allergy.

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Pesek, R.D., Jones, S.M. Current and Emerging Therapies for IgE-Mediated Food Allergy. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 16, 28 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11882-016-0610-0

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Keywords

  • Oral immunotherapy
  • OIT
  • Sublingual immunotherapy
  • SLIT
  • Omalizumab
  • Epicutaneous immunotherapy
  • EPIT
  • Food allergy