Teaching reading in an inner city school through a multisensory teaching approach

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy of the multisensory teaching approach to improve reading skills at the first-grade level. The control group was taught by the Houghton-Mifflin Basal Reading Program while the treatment group was taught by the Language Basics: Elementary, which incorporates the Orton-Gillingham-based Alphabetic Phonics Method. The results showed that the treatment group made statistically significant gains in phonological awareness, decoding, and reading comprehension while the control group made gains only on reading comprehension.

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Correspondence to R. Malatesha Joshi.

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Joshi, R.M., Dahlgren, M. & Boulware-Gooden, R. Teaching reading in an inner city school through a multisensory teaching approach. Ann. of Dyslexia 52, 229–242 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11881-002-0014-9

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Keywords

  • Reading Comprehension
  • Phonological Awareness
  • Dyslexia
  • National Reading Panel
  • Dyslexia Society