Traditional, developmental, and structured language approaches to spelling: Review and recommendations

Abstract

Current research does not support the notion that spelling is a simple rote-memory task. Learning to spell is better understood as a complex developmental process that is interconnected with phonological awareness and reading ability. In this review, three perspectives on spelling theory, research, and instruction are examined. Traditional classroom-based, developmental, and structured language approaches are outlined and their implications for assisting poor spellers explored. Instructional recommendations are made by drawing from and combining some of the strengths of each method.

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Correspondence to Bob Schlagal.

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Schlagal, B. Traditional, developmental, and structured language approaches to spelling: Review and recommendations. Ann. of Dyslexia 51, 147–176 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11881-001-0009-y

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Keywords

  • Phonological Awareness
  • Dyslexia
  • Phonemic Awareness
  • Disable Reader
  • Short Vowel