ZDM

, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp 393–409 | Cite as

Improving teaching, developing teachers and teacher educators, and linking theory and practice through lesson study in mathematics: an international perspective

Survey Paper

Abstract

This introductory article aims to provide a synthesis of the state-of-the art studies on lesson study with in-service mathematics teachers and an outlook on the entire issue. First, we report a systematic literature review on lesson study with in-service mathematics teachers. The findings are synthesized into four themes that include conceptualization of lesson study, theoretical perspectives on research on lesson study, benefits of implementing lesson study, and challenges in adapting lesson study. Then, we briefly introduce the articles in the current issue under four clusters. These are conceptualizations and adaptation of lesson study, teacher learning and improving teaching through lesson study, knowledgeable others’ learning, and interplay between theory and practice through lesson study. The literature review and the other articles in this special issue provide a ground for readers to reflect critically on the current research on and practice of lesson study and to discuss future directions for the development of lesson study.

Keywords

Lesson study Learning study Teacher learning Student learning Collaborative learning community Theory and practice 

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Copyright information

© FIZ Karlsruhe 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Middle Tennessee State UniversityMurfreesboroUSA
  2. 2.University of TsukubaTsukubaJapan

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