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Comparison and contrast: similarities and differences of teachers’ views of effective mathematics teaching and learning from four regions

Abstract

This paper brings together the findings of the previous papers in this volume and makes comparisons between the findings from each of the four regions considered. The findings of these comparisons suggest that there are particular characteristics of effective teachers and teaching in mathematics that can be ascribed to Eastern cultures and some other characteristics that can be best ascribed to Western cultures. However, perhaps more strikingly, there are many similarities in the ways in which teachers from the four regions see effective mathematics teaching and learning.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Words of Confucius quoted in Chap. 1 of the Analects

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Acknowledgment

The research involving Mainland Chinese and US teachers was supported, in part, by grants from the Spencer Foundation. Any opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Spencer Foundation. An earlier version of this paper was completed as an independent study by Carole A. Bryan under the supervision of Jinfa Cai at the University of Delaware.

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Correspondence to Jinfa Cai.

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Bryan, C.A., Wang, T., Perry, B. et al. Comparison and contrast: similarities and differences of teachers’ views of effective mathematics teaching and learning from four regions. ZDM Mathematics Education 39, 329–340 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11858-007-0035-2

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Keywords

  • Classroom Management
  • Effective Teacher
  • Real Life Problem
  • Mathematical Understanding
  • Rote Memorization