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Stakeholders’ perceptions of coastal development in relation to marine protected areas

Abstract

As marine protected areas (MPAs) face various coastal threats, including development, their incorporation into integrated coastal management (ICM) is essential. Stakeholder participation is a major, albeit poorly addressed, component of the integration of MPAs into ICM. Driven by shared interests and values, stakeholders can signal when coastal activities become unacceptable according to good governance principles of MPAs and ICM. This study assessed stakeholders’ perceptions of coastal development associated with an MPA in southern Mozambique. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and focus groups with 31 individuals representing five stakeholder groups. Stakeholders acknowledged the connection of MPAs with ICM at a sophisticated level, identifying coastal development threats potentially affecting the MPA, and proposing mitigation strategies. The results of this study confirmed the qualities of stakeholder participation to complement MPA management and offer guidance on ICM.

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Acknowledgements

The authors extend their sincere gratitude to all the participants in this study. Special thanks go to the manager of the PPMR Miguel Gonçalves, Eliana Ferretti, Minoo Esfehani, Antonio Sarà, Martina Milanese, Carlo Cerrano, Maria Annino, Lisa Pola, Angelina Neves, Ana Alexandra Araújo do Rosário, Emile Coetzee and Machiel Koch. This study was funded by the Green Bubbles RISE project, H2020-MSCA-RISE-2014. The project has received funding from the European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 643712. This paper reflects only the authors’ view. The Research Executive Agency is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information it contains. This study was approved by the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences Research Ethics Committee (EMS-REC) at the North-West University under the ethics code EMS2016/11/25-02/10.

Funding

This study was supported by H2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions (643712).

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Correspondence to Serena Lucrezi.

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Lucrezi, S. Stakeholders’ perceptions of coastal development in relation to marine protected areas. J Coast Conserv 25, 46 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11852-021-00834-3

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Keywords

  • Integrated coastal management
  • Southern Mozambique
  • Urban planning
  • Infrastructure
  • Port construction
  • Marine tourism