Ideation in the digital age: literature review and integrative model for electronic brainstorming

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Abstract

Various brainstorming techniques have been proposed to facilitate and enhance creativity during idea generation (ideation) sessions. A review of previous studies on brainstorming has been conducted, focusing on electronic brainstorming (EBS) as a seemingly suitable and prevalent platform in the twenty-first century. Based on the review, we propose an integrative model for EBS sessions, which includes guidelines and suggested improvements. Insights gained from this review can be used to guide decision-makers and managers in organizations on how to conduct EBS sessions efficiently and effectively. Additionally, this review maps existing research on EBS and outlines lacunas and gaps future research should investigate.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Bank Leumi’s innovation unit for their generous support and sponsorship of this research.

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Correspondence to Yossi Maaravi.

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Maaravi, Y., Heller, B., Shoham, Y. et al. Ideation in the digital age: literature review and integrative model for electronic brainstorming. Rev Manag Sci (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11846-020-00400-5

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Keywords

  • Brainstorming
  • Electronic brainstorming
  • Digital brainstorming
  • EBS
  • Ideation
  • Creativity

Mathematics Subject Classification

  • 62P25 Applications of statistics to social sciences