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Smallholder Farmers’ Knowledge of Regulations Governing the Sale of Timber and Supply Chains in Gunungkidul District, Indonesia

Abstract

Smallholder timber plantations may offer opportunities for farmers to increase their income. Nonetheless, such opportunities are often lost largely due to unfavorable regulations imposed on harvesting and marketing of timber. Adverse impacts are worsened because the regulations are not effectively communicated to smallholder farmers. We assessed the level of smallholder knowledge of existing regulations and found it very low. In part, this correlated to their socio-demographic characteristics. Poor literacy skills and a low level of education make it difficult for older farmers’ to increase their knowledge. This is compounded by the limited information channels that can reach the farmers. Improving smallholders’ knowledge by providing information concerning markets and regulations in a timely and clear manner could help smallholders exercise coping strategies and priorities when selling their timber that would in turn reduce the negative impacts of regulations. The roles of village authorities could be crucial. They are close to the smallholders and could channel the information. The government could provide training and incentives for them to be more active in communicating the regulations to the smallholders.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The basic education level in Indonesia is 9 years, comprising 6 years of Elementary School plus 3 years of Junior High School.

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Acknowledgments

This paper is part of policy research under Objective 3 led by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) project “Development of timber and non-timber forest products’ production and market strategies for improvement of smallholders’ livelihoods in Indonesia”. It was funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) (FST/2012/039). The local partners in Gunungkidul are Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) and Farm Forestry Consortium (Kelompok Kerja Hutan Rakyat Lestari).

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Correspondence to Ahmad Maryudi.

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Maryudi, A., Nawir, A.A., Sekartaji, D.A. et al. Smallholder Farmers’ Knowledge of Regulations Governing the Sale of Timber and Supply Chains in Gunungkidul District, Indonesia. Small-scale Forestry 16, 119–131 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11842-016-9346-x

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Keywords

  • Low education
  • Limited information channels
  • Legality verification
  • Certification
  • Private forests