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Comparison of Carbon Stocks Between Mixed and Pine-Dominated Forest Stands Within the Gwalinidaha Community Forest in Lalitpur District, Nepal

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Abstract

Forests play an important role in the global carbon cycle as both a source and sink of carbon. The carbon stock in a forest is affected by climate, tree species and forest management. The community forestry program of Nepal has been successful in reviving degraded forest patches in the Mid-hills but there is a lack of information whether mixed or pine plantations store more carbon. This study estimated and compared carbon stocks in mixed and pine-dominated forest stands within the Gwalinidaha Community Forest of Lalitpur District, Central Nepal. Carbon components considered include tree biomass carbon, root biomass carbon, litter biomass carbon and soil organic carbon. Total carbon stock of the forest is estimated to be 2,250.24 tons with average carbon stock of 166.68 tons/ha. Total carbon stock per hectare was found to be higher in the pine-dominated forest as compared to mixed forest due to the larger tree biomass although the litter carbon and soil organic carbon estimates are higher in the latter. The Community Forestry of Nepal has a huge potential for carbon storage and the pine-dominated forest has a greater carbon stock than mixed forest.

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Acknowledgments

We like to express our sincere gratitude to Tek Maraseni and Steve Harrison for their kind co-operation and encouragement. We are also thankful to the Central Department of Environmental Science of Tribhuvan University for access to their laboratory to test soil samples. Similarly, we are indebted to member of Gwalindaha Community Forest, Users Groups, Lalitpur, Nepal, for their kind cooperation during data collection.

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Correspondence to Rohini P. Devkota.

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Aryal, S., Bhattarai, D.R. & Devkota, R.P. Comparison of Carbon Stocks Between Mixed and Pine-Dominated Forest Stands Within the Gwalinidaha Community Forest in Lalitpur District, Nepal. Small-scale Forestry 12, 659–666 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11842-013-9236-4

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