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Review of Keith Ward, Christ and the Cosmos: A Reformulation of Trinitarian Doctrine Cambridge University Press, 2015, ISBN:978-1107531819, pb, xvii+271pp

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  1. According to the Athanasian Creed, the Son and Spirit are not created by the Father, but rather the Son is generated by the Father and the Spirit proceeds from the Father. One way to understand Ward’s criticism is to say that if the Son and the Spirit are really distinct centers of consciousness from the Father—distinct individuals—then ‘generation’ and ‘procession’ are really just ways of being created by the Father.

  2. Now, there is an immanent Trinity, he claims: it consists of God’s dispositions to create, redeem, and sanctify. Though the three revealed persons mentioned in the creeds are ‘rooted’ in these immanent dispositions, they should not be identified with them.

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Woodward, P. Review of Keith Ward, Christ and the Cosmos: A Reformulation of Trinitarian Doctrine Cambridge University Press, 2015, ISBN:978-1107531819, pb, xvii+271pp. SOPHIA 56, 375–377 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11841-017-0602-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11841-017-0602-0