JOM

, Volume 68, Issue 3, pp 1031–1036 | Cite as

Preparation of MoO2 by the Solid State Reaction Between MoS2 and MoO3

  • Lu Wang
  • Chun-Yang Bu
  • Guo-Hua Zhang
  • Tao Jiang
  • Kuo-Chih Chou
Article

Abstract

In the present study, the solid state reactions between molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) under different mixing molar ratios and different reaction temperatures have been investigated in order to produce industrial grade molybdenum dioxide (MoO2). It was found that it was difficult to react completely when the temperature was less than 873 K. However, when the temperature was up to 923 K or 973 K, the final product MoO2 with low residual sulfur can be obtained. Results of the residual sulfur levels at different conditions show that the content of residual sulfur decreases with the increase of temperature. In addition, the excess additions of MoO3 are effective and necessary in order to decrease the residual sulfur level. When the mixing molar ratio of MoS2 to MoO3 is 1:6.5, the content of residual sulfur can decrease down to 0.075% at 973 K. It was also found that the reaction between MoS2 and MoO3 obeyed the shrinking core model.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge the support by Jinduicheng Molybdenum Industry Co., Ltd. in raw material and the financial support from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (51304018, 51174022 and 51474141).

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Copyright information

© The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lu Wang
    • 1
  • Chun-Yang Bu
    • 2
  • Guo-Hua Zhang
    • 1
  • Tao Jiang
    • 1
  • Kuo-Chih Chou
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Advanced MetallurgyUniversity of Science and Technology BeijingBeijingChina
  2. 2.Jinduicheng Molybdenum Co. Ltd.Xi’anChina

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