JOM

, Volume 59, Issue 9, pp 43–48 | Cite as

Heterogeneous microstructure sensitive design for performance optimization of MEMS switch

  • T. S. Lemmon
  • E. R. Homer
  • B. S. Fromm
  • D. T. Fullwood
  • B. D. Jensen
  • B. L. Adams
Resarch Summary Mechanics and Modeling Issues in Materials Design

Abstract

Designers have traditionally simplified the consideration of material properties because of the diffi culty in incorporating anisotropy and non-homogeneity into design problems. Microstructure sensitive design for performance optimization (MSDPO) introduces the necessary tools to optimize both geometric design and anisotropic material properties concurrently, while also considering heterogeneous placement. In this paper a case study is presented wherein the geometry and microstructure of a micro-electro-mechanical system switch are optimized to minimize the actuation voltage, while ensuring that plastic yielding does not occur during operation. This is accomplished by varying both beam width and crystallographic texture along the length of the beam. The designed switch is predicted to reduce the actuation voltage by 90%. While this case study does not identify the manufacturing processes required to produce the optimized microstructure, such considerations can be included in MSDPO, but lie beyond the scope of this paper.

Keywords

Beam Width Crystallographic Texture Property Closure Plastic Yielding Actuation Voltage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. S. Lemmon
    • 1
  • E. R. Homer
    • 1
  • B. S. Fromm
    • 1
  • D. T. Fullwood
    • 1
  • B. D. Jensen
    • 1
  • B. L. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.the Mechanical Engineering DepartmentBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA

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