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JOM

, Volume 56, Issue 6, pp 28–31 | Cite as

Carbon nanotubes and other fullerene-related nanocrystals in the environment: A TEM study

  • L. E. Murr
  • K. F. Soto
  • E. V. Esquivel
  • J. J. Bang
  • P. A. Guerrero
  • D. A. Lopez
  • D. A. Ramirez
Research Summary Feature

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes and other fullerene-related nanocrystals are ubiquitous in the atmospheric environment—both indoor and outdoor. In fact, these nanostructures have been observed even in a 10,000 year-old ice core sample, indicating their natural existence in antiquity, probably as natural gas/methane combustion products. Similar carbon nanotubes and complex carbon nanocrystal aggregates are observed to be emitted from contemporary combustion sources such as kitchen stoves (natural gas and propane), water heater and furnace exhaust vents, natural gas-burning (electric) power plants, and industrial furnace operations, among others. These observations have been made by collecting nanoparticulates and nanocrystal aggregates on carbon/formvar and silicon monoxide/formvarcoated 3 mm grids that were examined with a transmission-electron microscope. This study begins to establish an environmental context for considering the potential impact of future nanostructured particles on human health.

Keywords

Carbon Nanotubes SAED Pattern Carbon Black Particle Combustion Source Related Carbon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. E. Murr
    • 1
  • K. F. Soto
    • 1
  • E. V. Esquivel
    • 1
  • J. J. Bang
    • 1
  • P. A. Guerrero
    • 1
  • D. A. Lopez
    • 1
  • D. A. Ramirez
    • 1
  1. 1.the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at the University of Texas at El PasoUSA

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