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JOM

, Volume 56, Issue 3, pp 57–61 | Cite as

Modeling multilayered MEMS-based micro-fluidic systems

  • Shekhar Bhansali
  • Helen Benjamin
  • Vandana Upadhyay
  • H. Thurman Henderson
  • Chong H. Ahn
  • Nihat Okulan
  • Kwang Wook Oh
Research Summary Computational Fluid Dynamics

Abstract

This article describes the design, fabrication, and simulation of two micro-electromechanical systems-based micro-fluidic systems. The first system, a lab-on-a-chip, enables electrochemical immunoassay-based chemical/biological detection. The second is a micro-fluidic bio-impedance sensor. The relevance of fluidic dynamics in micro-fluidic channels is discussed in context of fluid paths and misalignments in the channels that appear during multi-level structure integration. Also discussed is the effect of channel dimensions on the flow profile and on performance within the micro-systems.

Keywords

Electrical Impedance Tomography High Pressure Drop Electrochemical Immunoassay Inlet Length Voltage Potential Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© TMS 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shekhar Bhansali
    • 1
  • Helen Benjamin
    • 1
  • Vandana Upadhyay
    • 1
  • H. Thurman Henderson
    • 2
  • Chong H. Ahn
    • 2
  • Nihat Okulan
    • 3
  • Kwang Wook Oh
    • 3
  1. 1.the Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, Department of Electrical Engineeringthe University of South FloridaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Computer Sciencethe Center for Microelectronic Sensors and MEMSUSA
  3. 3.the University of CincinnatiUSA

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