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Temperature regimes and aphid density interactions differentially influence VOC emissions in Arabidopsis

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Abstract

The effects of volatile emissions from plants exposed to individual abiotic and biotic stresses are well documented. However, the influence of multiple stresses on plant photosynthesis and defense responses, resulting in a variety of volatile profiles has received little attention. In this study, we investigated how temperature regimes in the presence and absence of the sucking insect Myzus persicae affected volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in Arabidopsis over three time periods (0–24, 24–48, and 48–72 h). Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was used to evaluate Arabidopsis VOCs. The results showed that under laboratory conditions, eight volatile classes [alcohols (mainly 2-ethyl-hexan-1-ol), ketone (6-methyl hept-5-en-2-one), esters (mainly (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate), aldehydes (mainly phenylacetaldehyde), isothiocyanates (mainly 4-methylpentyl isothiocyanate), terpenes (mainly (E,E)-α-farnesene), nitrile (5-(methylthio) pentanenitrile), and sulfide (dimethyl trisulfide)] were observed on plants exposed to stress combinations, whereas emissions of six volatile classes were observed during temperature stress treatments alone (with the exception of nitriles and sulfides). Aphid density at high temperature combinations resulted in significantly higher isothiocyanate, ester, nitrile, and sulfide proportions. The results of the present study provide an insight into the effects of temperature–aphid interactions on plant volatile emissions.

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Acknowledgments

Dieu-Hien Truong is recipient of a Ph.D. scholarship from Ministry of Education and Training Vietnam. Benjamin Delory and Maryse Vanderplanck received financial support from the Belgian Fund for Scientific Research (FRS-FNRS). The authors are grateful to Dr. Ian Dublon (Evolutionary Ecology and Genetics Group, Earth and Life Institute, Université catholique de Louvain) for his helpful collaboration.

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Correspondence to Dieu-Hien Truong or Georges Lognay.

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Truong, DH., Delory, B.M., Vanderplanck, M. et al. Temperature regimes and aphid density interactions differentially influence VOC emissions in Arabidopsis . Arthropod-Plant Interactions 8, 317–327 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11829-014-9311-6

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