Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Vibration

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 313–329 | Cite as

Conceptual study of X-braced frames with different steel grades using cyclic half-scale tests

Article

Abstract

In this paper, an experimental and analytical study of two half-scale steel X-braced frames with equal nominal shear strength under cyclic loading is described. In these tests, all members except the braces are similar. The braces are made of various steel grades to monitor the effects of seismic excitation. Internal stiffeners are employed to limit the local buckling and increase the fracture life of the steel bracing. A heavy central core is introduced at the intersection of the braces to decrease their effective length. Recent seismic specifications are considered in the design of the X-braced frame members to verify their efficiency. The failure modes of the X-braced frames are also illustrated. It is observed that the energy dissipation capacity, ultimate load capacity and ductility of the system increase considerably by using lower grade steel and proposed detailing. Analytical modeling of the specimens using nonlinear finite element software supports the experimental findings.

Keywords

bracing low grade steel experimentation cyclic test seismic behavior analytical modeling ductility 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Engineering Mechanics, China Earthquake Administration and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Structural EngineeringKhaje Nasir Toosi University of TechnologyTehranIran

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