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The greater roles of indigenous microorganisms in removing nitrobenzene from sediment compared with the exogenous Phragmites australis and strain JS45

Abstract

The feasibility of using Phragmites australis-JS45 system in removing nitrobenzene from sediments was conducted. However, it was observed that nitrobenzene degraded rapidly and was removed completely within 20 days in native sediments, raising the possibility that indigenous microorganisms may play important roles in nitrobenzene degradation. Consequently, this study aimed to verify this possibility and investigate the potential nitrobenzene degraders among indigenous microorganisms in sediments. The abundance of inoculated strain JS45 and indigenous bacteria in sediments was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, community structure of the indigenous bacteria was analyzed through high throughput sequencing based on Illumina MiSeq platform. The results showed that indigenous bacteria in native sediments were abundant, approximately 1014 CFU/g dry weight, which is about six orders of magnitude higher than that in fertile soils. In addition, the levels of indigenous Proteobacteria (Acinetobacter, Comamonadaceae_ uncultured, Pseudomonas, and Thauera) and Firmicutes (Clostridium, Sporacetigenium, Fusibacter, Youngiibacter, and Trichococcus) increased significantly during nitrobenzene removal. Their quantities sharply decreased after nitrobenzene was removed completely, except for Pseudomonas and Thauera. Based on the results, it can be concluded that indigenous microorganisms including Proteobacteria and Firmicutes can have great potential for removing nitrobenzene from sediments. Although P. australis - JS45 system was set up in an attempt to eliminate nitrobenzene from sediments, and the system did not meet the expectation. The findings still provide valuable information on enhancing nitrobenzene removal by optimizing the sediment conditions for better growth of indigenous Proteobacteria and Firmicutes.

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Correspondence to Wei Liang.

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Chi, X., Zhang, Y., Wang, D. et al. The greater roles of indigenous microorganisms in removing nitrobenzene from sediment compared with the exogenous Phragmites australis and strain JS45. Front. Environ. Sci. Eng. 12, 11 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11783-018-1016-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11783-018-1016-0

Keywords

  • Community structure
  • Indigenous microorganisms
  • Nitrobenzene
  • Plant-microbe associated remediation
  • Sediment