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Applied Geophysics

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 270–278 | Cite as

Hybrid absorbing boundary condition for three-dimensional elastic wave modeling

  • Xin Liu
  • Yang Liu
  • Zhi-Ming Ren
  • Xiao-Hui Cai
  • Bei Li
  • Shi-Gang Xu
  • Le-Kai Zhou
Article

Abstract

Edge reflections are inevitable in numerical modeling of seismic wavefields, and they are usually attenuated by absorbing boundary conditions. However, the commonly used perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition requires special treatment for the absorbing zone, and in three-dimensional (3D) modeling, it has to split each variable into three corresponding variables, which increases the computing time and memory storage. In contrast, the hybrid absorbing boundary condition (HABC) has the advantages such as ease of implementation, less computation time, and near-perfect absorption; it is thus able to enhance the computational efficiency of 3D elastic wave modeling. In this study, a HABC is developed from two-dimensional (2D) modeling into 3D modeling based on the 1st Higdon one way wave equations, and a HABC is proposed that is suitable for a 3D elastic wave numerical simulation. Numerical simulation results for a homogenous model and a complex model indicate that the proposed HABC method is more effective and has better absorption than the traditional PML method.

Keywords

3D elastic wave equation hybrid absorbing boundary condition forward modeling 

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Copyright information

© Editorial Office of Applied Geophysics and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xin Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yang Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhi-Ming Ren
    • 3
  • Xiao-Hui Cai
    • 4
  • Bei Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shi-Gang Xu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Le-Kai Zhou
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources and ProspectingChina University of PetroleumBeijingChina
  2. 2.CNPC Key Laboratory of Geophysics ProspectingChina University of PetroleumBeijingChina
  3. 3.School of GeoscienceChina University of Petroleum (East China)QingdaoChina
  4. 4.Institute of Geotechnical EngineeringNanjing University of TechnologyNanjingChina

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