Journal of Cancer Survivorship

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 663–673

Fear of cancer recurrence: a theoretical review and novel cognitive processing formulation

  • Joanna E Fardell
  • Belinda Thewes
  • Jane Turner
  • Jemma Gilchrist
  • Louise Sharpe
  • Allan ‘Ben’ Smith
  • Afaf Girgis
  • Phyllis Butow
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s11764-015-0512-5

Cite this article as:
Fardell, J.E., Thewes, B., Turner, J. et al. J Cancer Surviv (2016) 10: 663. doi:10.1007/s11764-015-0512-5

Abstract

Purpose

Fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) is prevalent among survivors. However, a comprehensive and universally accepted theoretical framework of FCR to guide intervention is lacking. This paper reviews theoretical frameworks previously used to explain FCR and describes the formulation of a novel theoretical framework for FCR.

Methods

A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify conceptual frameworks or theories applied to FCR. MEDLINE, PubMED, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO and Web of Science were searched. Identified conceptual frameworks were reviewed for strength of evidence supporting their validity.

Results

Of 558 papers initially identified, 16 made reference to six different conceptual frameworks relating to FCR. The most comprehensive and evidence-based theoretical approach is the Common Sense Model (CSM). Other approaches have limited evidence supporting their application to FCR. Two theoretical approaches developed in the context of emotional disorders that appear to be highly relevant to FCR: the Self-Regulatory Executive Function (S-REF) model and Relational Frame Theory were combined with the CSM to produce a novel cognitive processing account of FCR.

Conclusions

Few conceptual frameworks have been used consistently to guide FCR research, and not all frameworks are empirically well supported, suggesting that further discussion regarding the conceptualisation of FCR is needed. The novel theoretical framework for FCR presented highlights the multidimensional nature of FCR and the importance of cognitive processing and metacognitions in the development and maintenance of FCR.

Implications for Cancer Survivors

The novel theoretical formulation of FCR outlined here provides a much-needed comprehensive framework to further investigate and address FCR in cancer survivors.

Keywords

Fear of cancer recurrence Cancer Oncology Survivorship Metacognitive Therapy Acceptance and Commitment Therapy 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
Cancer Australia (AU)
  • CAPdCCRS 1022584
National Breast Cancer Foundation (AU)
  • CAPdCCRS 1022584
beyondblue (AU)
  • CAPdCCRS 1022584

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joanna E Fardell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Belinda Thewes
    • 1
    • 8
  • Jane Turner
    • 3
  • Jemma Gilchrist
    • 4
  • Louise Sharpe
    • 5
  • Allan ‘Ben’ Smith
    • 1
  • Afaf Girgis
    • 6
  • Phyllis Butow
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG)University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Behavioural Sciences Unit, School of Women’s and Children’s HealthUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Mental Health Centre, School of MedicineUniversity of QueenslandSt LuciaAustralia
  4. 4.Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Breast Cancer InstituteWestmead HospitalSydneyAustralia
  5. 5.School of PsychologyUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  6. 6.Centre for Oncology Education and Research Translation (CONCERT), Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, South Western Sydney Clinical School, UNSW MedicineUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  7. 7.Chris O’Brien Lifehouse (C39Z), School of PsychologyThe University Of SydneySydneyAustralia
  8. 8.Department of Medical PsychologyRadboud University Medical CentreNijmegen (840)The Netherlands

Personalised recommendations