Archaeologies

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 1–33 | Cite as

Introduction: Feminist Theories and Archaeology

Introduction

Abstract

This journal issue developed out of a desire to increase the use of feminist theory in archaeology, leading me to ask Laurajane Smith of York University to co-organize a symposium on the topic for the World Archaeological Congress in Dublin in July 2008. The impacts of major feminist theories on constructions of the past and archaeological thinking are discussed, emphasizing how they implicitly or explicitly influenced other articles in this journal issue.

Key words

Feminist theory Gender Archaeology 

Résumé

Ce numéro de revue a été développé à partir de la volonté d’accroître l’utilisation de la théorie féministe en archéologie, ce qui me conduit à demander à Laurajane Smith de l’Université York de s’associer à l’organisation d’un colloque sur le sujet pour le Congrès mondial d’archéologie à Dublin, en juillet 2008. Les effets des grandes théories féministes sur les constructions de la pensée passée et archéologiques sont discutées, en soulignant la façon dont ils influencent, implicitement ou explicitement, d’autres articles dans ce numéro de revue.

Resumen

Esta edición de la revista nace desde el deseo de fomentar el uso de la teoría feminista en la arqueología, un deseo que me impulsó a pedir a Laurajane Smith, de la Universidad de York, la organización conjunta de un simposio sobre el tema para el Congreso Mundial Arqueológico que tuvo lugar en Dublín en julio de 2008. Se comenta la repercusión que las principales teorías feministas han tenido en la interpretación del pasado y en el pensamiento arqueológico, haciendo hincapié en su influencia, tanto implícita como explícita, en otros artículos de esta edición de la revista.

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Copyright information

© World Archaeological Congress 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyOakland UniversityRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Peabody Museum of Archaeology and EthnologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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