Archaeologies

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 185–209 | Cite as

Archaeo-Ethnography, Auto-Archaeology: Introducing Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past

Research

Abstract

After significant research effort and publications over the course of a decade, a new generation of writings and research into archaeologies of the contemporary past is beginning to emerge, with a social and political awareness that appears more acute and more focused than before. Perhaps it is not too much of an exaggeration to say that this new generation of contemporary archaeologies can contribute in some small way to addressing specific problems and challenges that face contemporary and future society. In this introduction we begin to touch on this possibility, and introduce the papers and authors that explore it in further depth.

Keywords

Archaeology Contemporary past Archaeo-ethnography Auto-archaeology 

Résumé

Après l’effort de recherche significatif et des publications réalisées lors d’une décennie, une nouvelle génération d’écrits et de recherches dans les archéologies du passé contemporain commence à faire jour, avec une conscience sociale et politique qui apparaît plus aiguë et plus concentrée qu’auparavant. Peut-être n’est-ce pas trop exagéré de dire que cette nouvelle génération d’archéologies contemporaines peut contribuer d’une certaine façon, bien que restreinte, pour répondre aux problèmes et défis spécifiques aux problèmes auxquels feront face la société contemporaine et à venir. Dans cette introduction nous commençons à nous rendre compte de cette possibilité et de présenter les articles qui les explorent plus en profondeur.

Resumen

Tras el importante esfuerzo de investigación y publicación realizado en el transcurso de una década, está empezando a surgir una nueva generación de escritos y estudios de arqueología sobre el pasado contemporáneo, con una conciencia social y política que parece más aguda y más centrada que nunca. Tal vez no exageramos si decimos que esta nueva generación de arqueologías contemporáneas puede contribuir en cierta —aunque escasa— medida a solucionar problemas y dificultades específicas que afronta la sociedad actual ydel mañana. En esta introducción empezamos hablando de esta posibilidad y presentamos los trabajos y los autores que lo analizan con más detalle.

References Cited

  1. Appadurai, A. (1986). Commodities and the Politics of value. In Appadurai, A. (ed.), The social life of things: commodities in cultural perspective, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 3-63.Google Scholar
  2. Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at Large, University of Minneapolis Press, Minneapolis and New York.Google Scholar
  3. Augé, M. (1995). Non-places: introduction to an anthropology of supermodernity. Verso: London and New York.Google Scholar
  4. Augé, M. (2002). In the Metro. University of Minneapolis Press: Minneapolis and New York.Google Scholar
  5. Augé, M. (2004). Oblivion. University of Minneapolis Press: Minneapolis and New York.Google Scholar
  6. Ballbé, E.G. and Steadman, D.W. (2008). The Political, Social and Scientific Contexts of Archaeological Investigations of Mass Graves in Spain. Archaeologies 4(3): 429-444. doi:10.1007/s11759-008-9081-9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Baudrillard, J. (1994). Simulacra and Simulation, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  8. Baudrillard, J. (1995). The Gulf War Did Not Take Place, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Beck, C. M. (2002). The archaeology of scientific experiments at a nuclear testing ground. In Schofield J., Johnson W. G. and Beck C. M. (eds), Matériel Culture: the archaeology of twentieth century conflict, London and New York, Routledge, pp. 65-79.Google Scholar
  10. Beck, C. M., Schofield, J., and Drollinger, H. (2009). Archaeologists, activists and a contemporary peace camp. In Holtorf, C. and Piccini, A. (eds), Contemporary Archaeologies, Excavating Now, Frankfurt and Main, Peter Lang, pp. 95-122.Google Scholar
  11. Boellstorff, T. (2008). Coming of Age in Second Life: An anthropologist explores the virtually human, Princeton University Press: New Jersey.Google Scholar
  12. Bradley, A., Buchli, V., Fairclough, G., Hicks, D., Miller, J. and Schofield, J. (2004). Change and creation: Historic landscape character 1950–2000. English Heritage: London.Google Scholar
  13. Buchli, V. (1999). An archaeology of socialism, Berg: Oxford.Google Scholar
  14. Buchli, V. (2002). Introduction. In V. Buchli (ed.) The Material Culture Reader, London and New York, Berg, pp. 1-22.Google Scholar
  15. Buchli, V. (2007a). Afterword: Towards an archaeology of the contemporary past. In McAtackney, L., Palus, M. and Piccini, A. (eds) Contemporary and Historical Archaeology in Theory: Papers from the 2003 and 2004 CHAT conferences. BAR International Series 1677. Oxford, Archaeopress, pp. 115-18.Google Scholar
  16. Buchli, V. (2007b). Cold War on the domestic front. In Schofield, J. and Cocroft, W.D. (eds), A Fearsome Heritage: Diverse Legacies of the Cold War, Walnut Creek, Left Coast Press, pp. 211-20.Google Scholar
  17. Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (2001a). The absent present: Archaeologies of the contemporary past. In Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 3-18.Google Scholar
  18. Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (2001b). Models of production and consumption: Archaeologies of the contemporary past. In Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 21-25.Google Scholar
  19. Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (2001c). The archaeology of alienation: A late twentieth-century British council house. In Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 158–67.Google Scholar
  20. Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds). (2001d). Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York.Google Scholar
  21. Burstrom, M. (2007). Samtidsarkeologi. Introduktion till ett forskningsfält, Studentlitteratur, Lund.Google Scholar
  22. Byrne, D. and Nugent, M. (2004). Mapping attachment: A spatial approach to Aboriginal post-contact heritage, Department of Environment and Conservation (NSW): Sydney.Google Scholar
  23. Campbell, F. and J. Ulin 2004. Borderline Archaeology: A Practice of Contemporary Archaeology—Exploring Aspects of Creative Narratives and Performative Cultural Production. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Goteborg.Google Scholar
  24. Cocroft, W. and Thomas, R.J.C. (2003). Cold War: Building for Nuclear Confrontation 1946-89, English Heritage: London.Google Scholar
  25. Cocroft, W., Devlin, D, Schofield, J. and Thomas, R.J.C. (2006). War art: murals and graffiti – military life, power and subversion, Council for British Archaeology: York.Google Scholar
  26. Cox, M. (2001). Forensic archaeology in the UK. In Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 145-57.Google Scholar
  27. Cox, M., Flavel, A., Hanson, I., Laver, J. and Wessling, R. (2008). The scientific investigation of mass graves: Towards Protocols and Standard Operating Procedures, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  28. Crossland, Z. (2000). Buried lives: forensic archaeology and Argentina’s disappeared. Archaeological Dialogues 7(2): 146-159. doi:10.1017/S1380203800001707.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Crossland, Z. (2002). Violent spaces: conflict over the reappearance of Argentine’s disappeared. In Schofield, J., Johnson, W.G. and Beck, C.M. (eds) Matériel Culture: the Archaeology of Twentieth Century Conflict, Routledge, London and New York; pp. 115-31.Google Scholar
  30. Dewilde, M., P. Pype, M. de Meyer, F. Demeyere, W. Lammens, J. Degryse, F. Wyffels, and N. J. Saunders 2004. Belgium’s New Department of First World War Archaeology. Antiquity 78(4). http://antiquity.ac.uk/projGall/saunders/index.html.
  31. Dobinson, C.S., Lake, J. and Schofield, A.J. (1997). Monuments of War: defining England’s 20th-century defence heritage. Antiquity 71, 288-99.Google Scholar
  32. Doretti, M. and Fondebrider, L. (2001). Science and human rights: Truth, justice, reparation and reconciliation, a long way in Third World Countries. In Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 138-44.Google Scholar
  33. Douglas, M. and Isherwood, B. (1979). The world of goods: towards an anthropology of consumption, Routledge: London and New York.Google Scholar
  34. Eisenlohr, P. (2004). Language revitalisation and new technologies: Cultures of electronic mediation and the refiguring of communities. Annual Review of Anthropology 33: 21-45. doi:10.1146/annurev.anthro.33.070203.143900.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Fabian, J. (2002). Virtual Archives and Ethnographic writing: “Commentary” as a new genre? Current Anthropology 43(5): 775-786. doi:10.1086/342640.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Ferllini, R. (2007). Forensic Archaeology and Human Rights Violations, Charles C Thomas Publishers: Springfield, Illinois.Google Scholar
  37. Ferrándiz, F. (2006). The return of Civil War ghosts: The ethnography of exhumations in contemporary Spain. Anthropology Today 22(3): 7-12. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8322.2006.00437.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Finn, C.A. (2001). Artifacts: An Archaeologist’s Year in Silicon Valley, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. and London.Google Scholar
  39. Freitas, L. 1999. Cultura material, prática arqueológica e genero: Um estudo de caso, in Funari, P.P.A. (ed.) Cultura material e arqueologia histórica, IFCH/Unicamp, Campinas, pp. 275–317.Google Scholar
  40. Funari, P.P.A. and Zarankin, A. (2006). Arqueologı’a de la represio’n y la resistencia en Ame’rica Latina (1960–1980), Universidad Nacional de Catamarca/Encuentro: Catamarca.Google Scholar
  41. Gell, A. (1988). Technology and magic. Anthropology Today 4(2):6-9. doi:10.2307/3033230.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Gell, A. (1992). The enchantment of technology and the technology of enchantment, in Coote, J. and Shelton, A. (eds), Anthropology, Art and Aesthetics, Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 40-67.Google Scholar
  43. Gell, A. (1996). Vogel’s Net: Traps as Artworks and Artworks as Traps. Journal of Material Culture 1(1):15–38. doi:10.1177/135918359600100102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Gell, A. (1998). Art and Agency, Oxford University Press: Oxford.Google Scholar
  45. González-Ruibal, A. (2005). The need for a decaying past: The archaeology of oblivion in contemporary Galicia (NW Spain). Home Cultures 2: 129-201. doi:10.2752/174063105778053355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. González-Ruibal, A. (2006). The dream of reason: An archaeology of the failures of modernity in Ethiopia. Journal of Social Archaeology 6: 175-201. doi:10.1177/1469605306064239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. González-Ruibal, A. (2007). Making things public: Archaeologies of the Spanish Civil War. Public Archaeology 6: 203-226. doi:10.1179/175355307X264165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. González-Ruibal, A. (2008). Time to destroy: An archaeology of supermodernity. Current Anthropology 49(2): 247-79. doi:10.1086/526099.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Gorman, A.C. (2005). The cultural landscape of interplanetary space. Journal of Social Archaeology 5(1):85-107. doi:10.1177/1469605305050148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Gorman, A.C. (2009). Beyond the Space Race: the significance of space sites in a new global context, in Holtorf, C. and Piccini, A. (eds) Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now, Bern, Peter Lang, pp. 161-180.Google Scholar
  51. Gorman, A.C. and O’Leary, B. (2007). An ideological vacuum: The Cold War in outer space. In Schofield, J. and Cocroft, W. (eds), A Fearsome Heritage: Diverse Legacies of the Cold War, Left Coast Press, Walnut Creek, pp. 73-92.Google Scholar
  52. Gould, R.A (2007). Disaster Archaeology, University of Utah Press: Salt Lake City.Google Scholar
  53. Gould, R.A. and Schiffer, M.B. (eds) (1981). Modern material culture: The archaeology of us, Academic Press: New York.Google Scholar
  54. Graves-Brown, P. (2000a). Introduction. In Graves-Brown, P. (ed.) Matter, materiality and modern culture, Routledge, London and New York; pp. 1-9.Google Scholar
  55. Graves-Brown, P. (ed.) (2000b). Matter, materiality and modern culture. Routledge: London and New York.Google Scholar
  56. Graves-Brown, P. (2007a). Avtomat Kalashnikova. Journal of Material Culture 12(3): 285-307. doi:10.1177/1359183507081896.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Graves-Brown, P. (2007b). Concrete Islands, In McAtackney, L., Palus, M. and Piccini, A. (eds) Contemporary and Historical Archaeology in Theory: Papers from the 2003 and 2004 CHAT conferences. BAR International Series 1677. Archaeopress, Oxford, pp. 75-82.Google Scholar
  58. Graves-Brown, P. (2009). The privatisation of experience and the archaeology of the future. In Holtorf, C. and Piccini, A. (eds) Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now, Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main; pp. 201-213.Google Scholar
  59. Graves-Brown, P. forthcoming. March 1999 (?) The Library of Babel: Origins of the World Wide Web. In Defining Moments, Material Records—an Alternative Archaeology Of The Twentieth Century, Studies in Contemporary and Historical Archaeology, edited by J. Schofield, Archaeopress.Google Scholar
  60. Hall, M. (2001). Cape Town’s District Six and the archaeology of memory, in Layton, R., Stone, P., and Thomas, J. (eds) The destruction and conservation of cultural property, Routledge, London, pp. 298–311.Google Scholar
  61. Hall, M. (2005). Casino culture, in Casella, E.C. and Symonds, J. (eds) Industrial archaeology: Futuredirections, Kluwer/Plenum, New York, pp. 261–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Hall, M. (2006). Identity, memory, and countermemory: The archaeology of an urban landscape. Journal of Material Culture 11:189–209. doi:10.1177/1359183506063021.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Hall, M., and Bombardella, P. (2005). Las Vegas in Africa. Journal of Social Archaeology 5(1):5–24. doi:10.1177/1469605305050141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Harrison, R. (2004). Shared landscapes: Archaeologies of Attachment and the Pastoral Industry in New South Wales, UNSW Press: Sydney.Google Scholar
  65. Harrison, R. (2009). Excavating Second Life: cyber-archaeologies, heritage and virtual settlements. Journal of Material Culture 14(1): 75-106. doi:10.1177/1359183508100009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Harrison, R. and J. Schofield forthcoming. After Modernity: Archaeological Approaches of the Contemporary Past. Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  67. Harrison, R., McDonald, J. and Veth, P.M. (eds) (2005). Native title and Archaeology. Australian Aboriginal Studies 2005(1). Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra.Google Scholar
  68. Harvey, D. (1990). The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry Into the Origins of Cultural Change, Blackwell: Oxford.Google Scholar
  69. Hebdige, D. (1988). Subculture: The Meaning of Style, Routledge: London.Google Scholar
  70. Hicks, D. (2003). Archaeology unfolding: Diversity and the loss of isolation. Oxford Journal of Archaeology 22:315–29. doi:10.1111/1468-0092.00190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Hine, C. (2000). Virtual Ethnography, Sage: London.Google Scholar
  72. Hodder, I. (1987). Bow ties and pet foods: material culture and change in British industry. In Hodder, I. (ed.) The Archaeology of contextual meanings. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 11-19.Google Scholar
  73. Holtorf, C. (2004). Incavation—Excavation—Exhibition. In Brodie, N. and Hills, C. (eds) Material Engagements: Studies in honour of Colin Renfrew, MacDonald Institute Monographs, Cambridge; pp. 45-53.Google Scholar
  74. Holtorf, C. (2005). From Stonehenge to Las Vegas: Archaeology as Popular Culture, AltaMira Press: Walnut Creek.Google Scholar
  75. Holtorf, C. (2007) Archaeology is a Brand! The Meaning of Archaeology in Contemporary Popular Culture, Left Coast Press: Walnut Creek.Google Scholar
  76. Holtorf, C. (2008). Zoos as Heritage: An Archaeological Perspective. International Journal of Heritage Studies 14(1): 3-9. doi:10.1080/13527250701711994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Holtorf, C. (2009). Imagine this: Archaeology in the experience economy, in Holtorf, C. and Piccini, A. (eds) Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now, Peter Lang, Bern, pp. 47-64.Google Scholar
  78. Holtorf, C. and A. Piccini (editors) 2009. Contemporary Archaeologies, Excavating Now. Peter Lang, Frankfurt am Main.Google Scholar
  79. Hunter, J. and Cox, M. (2005). Forensic archaeology: Advances in theory and practice, Routledge: London and New York.Google Scholar
  80. Jameson, F. (1991). Postmodernism, or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism. Duke University Press. Durham.Google Scholar
  81. Johnson, W.G. (2002). Archaeological examination of Cold War architecture: a reactionary cultural response to the threat of nuclear war. In Schofield, J., Johnson, W.G. and Beck, C.M. (eds), Matériel Culture: the archaeology of twentieth century conflict, Routledge, London and New York; pp. 227-235.Google Scholar
  82. Kopytoff, I. (1986). The cultural biography of things: commoditization as process. In Appadurai, A. (ed.), The social life of things: commodities in cultural perspective, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 64-91.Google Scholar
  83. Legendre, J.P. (2001). Archaeology of World War 2: The Lancaster bomber of Fléville (Meurthe-et-Moselle, France), in Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 126-137.Google Scholar
  84. Lemonnier, P. (1986). The study of material culture today: Toward an Anthropology of Technical Systems. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 5: 147-86. doi:10.1016/0278-4165(86)90012-7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Lemonnier, P. 1992. Elements for an Anthropology of Technology. Anthropological Paper No. 88. University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Michigan.Google Scholar
  86. Lilley, I. (ed) (2000). Native Title and the Transformation of Archaeology in the Postcolonial World, Oceania Publications: Sydney.Google Scholar
  87. Lyotard, J.F. (1984). The Postmodern Condition: A report on knowledge, Manchester University Press: Manchester.Google Scholar
  88. Merriman, P. (2004). Driving Places: Marc Augé, Non-places, and the Geographies of England’s M1 Motorway. Theory, Culture and Society 21(4/5): 145–167 doi:10.1177/0263276404046065.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Miller, D. (1984a). Appropriating the state from the Council Estate. Man 23: 353-72. doi:10.2307/2802810.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  90. Miller, D. (1984b). Modernism and suburbia as Material Ideology, in Miller, D. and Tilley, C. (eds) Ideology, Power and Prehistory, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 37-49.Google Scholar
  91. Miller, D. (1987). Material culture as mass consumption, Blackwell: Oxford.Google Scholar
  92. Miller, D. (ed) (1995). Acknowledging Consumption: A review of new studies, Routledge, London and New York.Google Scholar
  93. Miller, D. (1998a). A theory of shopping, Polity Press: London.Google Scholar
  94. Miller, D. (ed) (1998b). Material Cultures, UCL Press: London.Google Scholar
  95. Miller, D. (2001) Behind closed doors, in Miller, D. (ed) Home Possessions: Material Culture behind closed doors, Berg, London, pp. 1-22.Google Scholar
  96. Miller, D. (2005a). Introduction, in Küchler, S. and Miller, D. (eds) Clothing as Material Culture, Berg, London pp. 1-20.Google Scholar
  97. Miller, D. (2005b). Materiality, Duke University Press: Durham.Google Scholar
  98. Miller, D. and Slater, D. (2000). The Internet: An Ethnographic Approach, Berg: London.Google Scholar
  99. Murray, N., Shepherd, N. and Hall, M. (eds) (2007). Desire lines: Space, memory, and identity in the post-apartheid city, Routledge: London.Google Scholar
  100. Olivier, L. (2000). L’impossible archéologie de la mémoire: A’propos de “W” ou le souvenir d’enfance de Georges Perec. European Journal of Archaeology 3:387–406. doi:10.1177/146195710000300302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Olivier, L. (2001). The archaeology of the contemporary past. In Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 175–88.Google Scholar
  102. Olivier, L. (2004). The past of the present: Archaeological memory and time. Archaeological Dialogues 10: 204–13. doi:10.1017/S1380203804001254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. Paterson, A. G., Gill, N. and Kennedy, M. (2003). An archaeology of historical reality? A case study of the recent past. Australian Archaeology 57: 82-89.Google Scholar
  104. Pearson, M. and Mullins, P. R. (1999). Domesticating Barbie: An archaeology of Barbie material culture and domestic ideology. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 3: 225–59. doi:10.1023/A:1022846525113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. Penrose, S. with contributors 2007. Images of Change: An Archaeology of England’s Contemporary Landscape. English Heritage, London.Google Scholar
  106. Perec, G. 1997. Species of Spaces and Other Pieces. Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  107. Piccini, A. and Holtorf, C. (2009). Introduction: Fragments from a Conversation about Contemporary Archaeologies. In Holtorf, C. and Piccini, A. (eds) Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now, Peter Lang, Bern, pp. 9-29.Google Scholar
  108. Rathje, W.L. (1979). Modern Material Culture Studies. Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory 2: 1-37.Google Scholar
  109. Rathje, W.L. (2001). Integrated archaeology. A garbage paradigm. In Buchli, V. and Lucas, G. (eds) Archaeologies of the contemporary past, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 63-76.Google Scholar
  110. Rathje, W.L. and Murphy, C. (1992). Rubbish! The archaeology of garbage, HarperCollins: New York.Google Scholar
  111. Robertson, A and Kenyon, D. (2008). Digging the Trenches: The Archaeology of the Western Front, Pen and Sword Books: Barnsley, Yorkshire.Google Scholar
  112. Saunders, N.J. (2001). Matter and memory in the landscapes of conflict: The Western Front 1914-1999. In Bender, B. and Winer, M. (eds) Contested Landscapes: Movement, Exile and Place, Berg, Oxford, pp. 37-53.Google Scholar
  113. Saunders, N.J. (2002). Archaeology and the Great War, 1914–2001. Antiquity 76:101–8.Google Scholar
  114. Saunders, N.J. (2003). Trench Art: Materialities and memories of war, Berg: Oxford.Google Scholar
  115. Saunders, N.J. (ed) (2004). Matters of Conflict: Material Culture, Memory and the First World War, Routledge: London and New York.Google Scholar
  116. Saunders, N.J. (2007). Killing time: Archaeology and the First World War, Thrupp: Sutton.Google Scholar
  117. Schiffer, M. (1991). The portable radio in American life, University of Arizona Press: Tucson and London.Google Scholar
  118. Schiffer, M. (2000). Indigenous theories, theories and product histories. In Graves-Brown, P. (ed.) Matter, Materiality and Modern Culture, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 172-196.Google Scholar
  119. Schnapp, A. (editor) 1997. Une archéologie du passé récent? Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme. Paris.Google Scholar
  120. Schofield, J. (2000). Never Mind the Relevance: Popular Culture for Archaeologists. In Graves-Brown, P. (ed.) Matter, Materiality and Modern Culture, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 131-155.Google Scholar
  121. Schofield, J. (2005). Combat archaeology: material culture and modern conflict. Duckworth Debates in Archaeology series, Duckworth, London.Google Scholar
  122. Schofield, J. (2009). Aftermath: Readings in the Archaeology of Recent Conflict, Springer: New York.Google Scholar
  123. Schofield, J., Johnson, W.G. and Beck, C.M. (eds) (2002). Matériel culture: the archaeology of twentieth century conflict, Routledge: London and New York.Google Scholar
  124. Schofield, J., Klausmeier, A. and Purbrick, L. (eds) (2006). Re-mapping the Field: New Approaches in Conflict Archaeology, Westkreuz-Verlag, Berlin.Google Scholar
  125. Shanks, M. and C. Tilley 1987. Re-constructing archaeology, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  126. Steele, C. (2008). Archaeology and the Forensic Investigation of Recent Mass Graves: Ethical Issues for a New Practice of Archaeology. Archaeologies 4(3): 414-428. doi:10.1007/s11759-008-9080-x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  127. Sterenberg, J. (2008). Forensic Archaeology, Anthropology and the Investigation of Mass Graves. International Forensic Science and Investigation Series. Taylor and Francis: London.Google Scholar
  128. Symonds, J. (2004) Historical Archaeology and the Recent Urban Past. International Journal of Heritage Studies 10(1): 33-48. doi:10.1080/1352725032000194231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  129. Ulin, J. (2009). In the space of the past: A family archaeology. In Holtorf, C. and Piccini, A. (eds) Contemporary Archaeologies: Excavating Now, Peter Lang, Bern; pp. 145-59.Google Scholar
  130. Virilio, P. (1994). Bunker Archeology, (Trans. From the French by George Collins), Les Editions du Semi-Circle: Paris.Google Scholar
  131. Wilson, S.M. and Peterson, L.C. (2002). The anthropology of online communities. Annual Review of Anthropology 31: 449-467. doi:10.1146/annurev.anthro.31.040402.085436.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  132. Zarankin, A. and Funari, P.P.F. (2008). “Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind”: Archaeology and construction of memory of military repression in South America (1960-1980). Archaeologies 4(2): 310-327. doi:10.1007/s11759-008-9068-6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  133. Zongming, Z. (2005). Living on the cyber border: Minjian Political writers in Chinese Cyberspace. Current Anthropology 46(5): 779-803. doi:10.1086/432453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© World Archaeological Congress 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of ArtsThe Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK
  2. 2.English HeritageSomersetUK

Personalised recommendations