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Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Monovarietal Olive Oils Produced in Argentina

  • Original Paper
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Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

Abstract

Virgin olive oil has high levels of phenolic compounds that are highly bioavailable; these compounds are receiving considerable attention for their antioxidant activity, closely related to the prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases. The aim of this work was to characterize the phenolic profile and antioxidant capacity of monovarietal olive oils cvs. Arauco, Arbequina, Farga and Empeltre produced in Argentina. This study focused on the relationship between the single molecules or classes of molecules quantified by SPE-CZE, the corresponding Folin-Ciocalteu results, and antioxidant capacity using three different tests. Fifteen compounds were simultaneously determined: tyrosol, vinylphenol, oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, rutin, catechin, naringenin, cinnamic acid, chlorogenic acid, syringic acid, luteolin, apigenin, vanillin acid, quercetin, and caffeic acid. The phenolic contents of the monovarietal olive oils show significant diffe rences between different varieties (p < 0.05), with positive and significant Pearson’s correlation found between Folin–Ciocalteu and CZE. Besides, the correlation between the content of total polyphenols and antioxidant capacity was high for all the antioxidant assays performed. When analyzing the correlation coefficients of the different families of phenolic compounds studied, simple phenols and cinnamic acid derivatives show a higher correlation with antioxidant capacity. Thus, findings obtained in this study demonstrated that Arauco olive oil, autochthonous for Argentina, possesses the highest antioxidant/free-radical scavenging properties, which are very likely due to the presence of high contents of phenolic compounds.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (Mendoza, Argentina). We are particularly grateful to Enrique Tittarelli for providing the equipment for the extraction of olive oil and assistance in the technical aspects of olive tree cultivation.

Conflict of interest

María de los Angeles Fernandez declares that she has no conflict of interest. Verónica Carolina Soto Vargas declares that she has no conflict of interest. María Fernanda Silva declares that she has no conflict of interest. This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects.

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Correspondence to María Fernanda Silva.

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de Fernandez, M.d., SotoVargas, V.C. & Silva, M.F. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Monovarietal Olive Oils Produced in Argentina. J Am Oil Chem Soc 91, 2021–2033 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-014-2558-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-014-2558-3

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