Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

, Volume 90, Issue 11, pp 1705–1712 | Cite as

Margarine from Organogels of Plant Wax and Soybean Oil

  • Hong-Sik Hwang
  • Mukti Singh
  • Erica L. Bakota
  • Jill K. Winkler-Moser
  • Sanghoon Kim
  • Sean X. Liu
Original Paper

Abstract

Organogels obtained from plant wax and soybean oil were tested for their suitability for incorporation into margarine. Sunflower wax, rice bran wax and candelilla wax were evaluated. Candelilla wax showed phase separation after making the emulsion with the formulation used in this study. Rice bran wax showed relatively good firmness with the organogel, but dramatically lowered firmness for a margarine sample. Sunflower wax showed the greatest firmness for organogel and the margarine samples among the three plant waxes tested in this study. Firmness of the margarine containing 2–6 % sunflower wax in soybean oil was similar to that of margarine containing 18–30 % hydrogenated soybean oil in soybean oil. The firmness of commercial spread could be achieved with about 2 % sunflower wax and that of commercial margarine could be achieved with about 10 % of sunflower wax in the margarine formulation. Dropping point, DSC and solid fat content of the new margarine containing 2–6 % sunflower wax showed a higher melting point than commercial margarine and spreads.

Keywords

Organogel Plant wax Margarine Spread Firmness Soybean oil Trans fat 

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Copyright information

© AOCS (outside the USA) 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hong-Sik Hwang
    • 1
  • Mukti Singh
    • 1
  • Erica L. Bakota
    • 1
  • Jill K. Winkler-Moser
    • 1
  • Sanghoon Kim
    • 2
  • Sean X. Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Research Service, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Functional Foods ResearchUnited States Department of AgriculturePeoriaUSA
  2. 2.Agricultural Research Service, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Plant Polymer ResearchUnited States Department of AgriculturePeoriaUSA

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