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Minor Components in Canola Oil and Effects of Refining on These Constituents: A Review

Abstract

Crude canola oil is composed mainly of triacylglycerols but contains considerable amounts of desirable and undesirable minor components. Crude canola oil is refined in order to remove undesirable minor compounds that make this oil unusable in food products. However, refining can also cause the removal of desirable health-promoting minor components from the oil. The first section of this review describes the chemical composition of canola oil, followed by a brief introduction to the effects of minor components on canola oil quality and stability. Following a review of traditional canola oil refining methods, the effects of individual refining stages on the removal of both desirable and undesirable components from canola oil are presented and contrasted with other common vegetable oils.

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Correspondence to Alejandro G. Marangoni.

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Ghazani, S.M., Marangoni, A.G. Minor Components in Canola Oil and Effects of Refining on These Constituents: A Review. J Am Oil Chem Soc 90, 923–932 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-013-2254-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-013-2254-8

Keywords

  • Canola oil
  • Refining
  • Minor constituents
  • Phytosterols
  • Tocopherols
  • Polyphenols
  • Degumming
  • Neutralization
  • Bleaching
  • Deodorization