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Effect of Feed Fat By-Products with Trans Fatty Acids and Heated Oil on Cholesterol and Oxycholesterols in Chicken

Abstract

Chicken is the most widely consumed meat all over the world due to chickens being easy to rear, their fast growth rate and the meat having good nutritional characteristics. The main objective of this paper was to study the effects of dietary fatty by-products in low, medium and high levels of oxidized lipids and trans fatty acids (TFAs) on the contents of cholesterol and oxycholesterols in meat, liver, and plasma of chickens. A palm fatty acid distillate, before and after hydrogenation, and a sunflower–olive oil blend (70/30, v/v) before and after use in a commercial frying process were used in feeding trials after adding 6% of the fats to the feeds. Highly oxidized lipid and TFA feeds significantly increased the contents of cholesterol and oxycholesterols in all tissues of chicken (0.01 < p ≤ 0.05). The contents of oxycholesterols in chicken meat, liver and plasma obtained from TFA feeding trials varied between 17 and 48 μg/100 g in meat, 19–42 μg/100 g in liver and 105–126 μg/dL in plasma. In contrast, in the oxidized lipid feeding trials, oxycholesterols varied between 13 and 75 μg/100 g in meat, 30–58 μg/100 g in liver and 66–209 μg/dL in plasma. Meat from chickens fed with feeds containing high levels of TFAs or oxidized lipids may contribute to higher ingestion of cholesterol and oxycholesterols by humans.

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Acknowledgments

This work was financially supported by the EU Feeding Fats Safety Research Project (FOOD-CT2004-007020). E. Blas, Department of Animal Science, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Barcelona, and M. D. Baucells, Veterinary School, University Autonoma, Barcelona, Spain, for feed manufacturing, housing of animals and slaughtering and sampling facilities. Dietrich von Rosen, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden for statistical analysis. Instituto Danone for a research grant to A. Tres.

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Correspondence to Sarojini J. K. A. Ubhayasekera.

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Ubhayasekera, S.J.K.A., Tres, A., Codony, R. et al. Effect of Feed Fat By-Products with Trans Fatty Acids and Heated Oil on Cholesterol and Oxycholesterols in Chicken. J Am Oil Chem Soc 87, 173–184 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-009-1480-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-009-1480-6

Keywords

  • Chicken tissues
  • Cholesterol
  • COPs
  • Feed fat
  • Oxidized lipids
  • Trans fatty acids